Matt Busby

Matt Busby

Alexander Matthew (Matt) Busby was born in the mining village of Orbiston, near Bellshill, Scotland, on 26th May 1909. The village included only 32 cottages.

Busby's mother, Nellie, was the daughter of Jimmy Greer, who worked down the pit in Orbiston with Matt's father, Alexander Busby. The birth of Matt was followed by three girls, Delia, Kathy and Margaret.

A Roman Catholic, Matt Busby attended St Bride's School. As he pointed out in his autobiography, Soccer at the Top: "I was as football daft as any of the boys in the village of Bellshill, and dafter than most, and we had our idols already. There were two young fellows called Alex James and Hughie Gallacher, for instance. They would be about eighteen or nineteen, I suppose, I about nine or ten." Alex James and Hughie Gallacher both went on to become leading stars in the Football League.

On the outbreak of the First World War Busby's father joined the British Army. He was posted to the Western Front and was killed at Arras in 1916. Three of Matt's uncles were also killed during the war. As Rick Glanvill pointed out in Sir Matt Busby: A Tribute: "Of the Busby menfolk, only Jimmy Greer and Matt were left when the war ended. Already an intelligent and well-behaved boy, Matt was compelled by circumstances to grow old before his time."

In 1919 Matt's mother married Harry Matthie. Matt did not get on very well with his step-father but he did developed a close relationship with his grandfather Jimmy Greer. He was a socialist and strong trade unionist who organized a boycott of the great music-hall star Harry Lauder after he attacked the miners for going on strike.

At the age of twelve, Busby's school principal recommended that he should transfer to Motherwell Higher Grade School. He added that Busby was very intelligent and had the potential to become a "first-class schoolteacher". However, Busby left school at 16 to become a miner. He later commented: "There were only two ways for boys to go in those days: down, working in the pits, or up, if you happened to be good at football."

Several members of the Busby family emigrated to the United States after they lost their husbands in the First World War. Nellie and Harry Matthie also wanted to go but Busby refused to join them as he was convinced that he would eventually make it as a professional footballer.

In 1926 Busby took part in the General Strike. Although he was eventually forced back to work these events made a deep impact on him and he remained a devout socialist for the rest of his life.

Busby joined Alpine Villa and in 1927 the club won the Under-18 Scottish Cup. He was watched by scouts from Rangers and Celtic. As his son, Sandy Busby later pointed out: "He went to Rangers for a trial. Then they found out he was a Catholic, and Celtic found out he'd had a trial with Rangers. But it was a blessing in disguise because he ended up in Manchester." Busby was signed by Manchester City in February 1928.

Busby, who was on a weekly wage of £5 a week during the season and £4 in the summer, decided to get married to his girlfriend Jean Menzies. He took time to settle and did not feature in the team that season. That summer he returned to Bellshill and later admitted that: "At home I was on top of the world but in Manchester my confidence deserted me the moment I returned to duty in July."

Busby played his first-team debut as an inside-left against Grimsby Town on 9th November 1929. He was dropped after only one game. He was recalled to the first team in March 1930 and finished up scoring three goals in 11 games that season. The team that year included Sam Cowan, Eric Brook, Fred Tilson, Jimmy McMullan and Ernie Toseland.

The following season Busby contracted pneumonia. When he returned to fitness he was played in the reserves at right-half. He was an immediate success and the following week he played in the first-team against Huddersfield Town. The following season he was virtually ever present (41 out of 42 games). At the time the team included players such as Sam Cowan, Jimmy McMullan, Eric Brook, Fred Tilson, Ernie Toseland and Jackie Bray.

Manchester City enjoyed a good FA Cup run in the 1932-33 season. Fred Tilson scored a hat-trick in City's 9-0 victory over Gateshead. Eric Brook scored both goals against Walsall (2-0) and a hat-trick against Bolton Wanderers (4-2). Tilson scored against Burnley (1-0) and Derby County (3-2) and Manchester City had reached the final at Wembley. The Everton team that day included players such as Dixie Dean, Cliff Britton, Ted Sager and Albert Geldard. With Tilson missing because of injury, City lost the game 3-0.

In the 1933-34 season Manchester City finished 5th in the First Division of the Football League. Busby scored 4 goals in 39 games that year. His form was so good that season he won his first international cap for Scotland against Wales on 4th October 1933. Wales won 3-2 and remarkably he was never selected again in peacetime. According to Paddy Crerand: "He only got one cap because there was a great deal of religious bigotry in Scotland... I'm a Catholic, I played for Celtic, and it was much more difficult to get a cap for Scotland than it was if you played for Rangers."

The club also enjoyed a good FA Cup run in the 1933-34 season beating Blackburn Rovers (3-1), Hull City (4-1), Sheffield Wednesday (2-0), Stoke City (1-0), Aston Villa (6-1) to reach the final against Portsmouth. On the way to Wembley the goals had been scored by Fred Tilson (7), Alec Herd (4), Ernie Toseland (4) and Eric Brook (3). The defence, that included players such as Busby, Frank Swift, Billy Dale, Sam Cowan and Jackie Bray, also performed well.

Sam Cowan introduces the future George VI to Matt Busby at the 1933 FA Cup Final.
Sam Cowan introduces the future George VI to Matt Busby at the 1933 FA Cup Final.

Manchester City played Portsmouth in the final at Wembley. Fred Tilson had such a terrible injury record that when Sam Cowan introduced him to George VI before the game, he said: "This is Tilson, your Majesty. He's playing today with two broken legs." It was a good job that Tilson did play as he scored both of the goals in the 2-1 victory to increase his total to nine in eight cup games that season. Frank Swift, City's young goalkeeper, was so overcome by the achievement that he fainted at the final whistle.

In April 1934 Wilf Wild signed Sam Barkas from Bradford City for a fee of £5,000. A stylish full-back, Barkas had the ability to "create positive-play from defensive positions". With the emergence of players such as Eric Brook, Alec Herd, Fred Tilson, Ernie Toseland, Frank Swift, Jackie Bray and Billy Dale, City was now seen as the club most likely to challenge the dominance of the Arsenal side that had won the league titles in the 1932-33, 1933-34 and 1934-35 seasons.

A record crowd of 79,491 watched the Manchester City game against Arsenal at Maine Road on 23rd February 1935. Eric Brook scored City's goal in the 1-1 draw. However, it was a disappointing season as City could only finish in 9th place in the league. That season Busby played in 33 of the 42 games.

Jimmy Heale played with Matt Busby that season. He later recalled: "It's well known that Matt played at right-half for City, but really his strongest foot was his left. His top move was to get past a few players moving towards the centre of the field, then switch it by hitting a ball over to the corner flag where Ernie Toseland would already be into his stride. That created lots of goal chances. Matt was, I suppose, what you call a schemer these days".

As Stanley Matthews once pointed out: "One of Matt's greatest strengths as a player was his passing. Not only could he split open defences but the pass was always so beautifully timed and weighted it was perfect for City forwards such as Eric Brook, Freddie Tilson or Alex Herd to latch on to without breaking their stride. For all players were tightly marked in the thirties, Matt could overcome all that with one sweeping pass. I think his ability to pick out team-mates with superlative passing was indicative of his great vision even then.

Tommy Lawton agreed that Busby was a great passer of the ball: "Surely football has never seen such an immaculate passer of the ball than the cheerful, likeable Scot. It was uncanny to see him change the direction of a game with one shrewd pass, which always went speedily and accurately to the right man. There was never anything slipshod about Matt. Only the best would do and no matter where the ball was he was always working, always taking up position, always thinking a couple of moves ahead of anyone else. So no wonder Matt Busby covered more ground in each match than any other player on the field, and to what wonderful purpose!"

Wilf Mannion added: "Matt Busby, tall sturdy Scottish international wing half back... was the model player in that position. In fact, I firmly believe that Busby would have been an ideal player in any position on the field simply because he had everything that I have stressed as being necessary in the make-up of a footballer. And he had it developed to an extraordinarily high degree. His passing, ball control, heading ability, interception, tackling and manoeuvrability were exceptional and to play against him must have been an inside forward's nightmare."

In March 1936, Liverpool manager George Patterson signed Matt Busby for £8,000. He had his debut against Huddersfield Town and the following month scored his first goal in a 2-2 draw with Blackburn Rovers. Tony Matthews, the author of Who's Who of Liverpool, argues that Busby "possessed all the skills, used the ball decisively and well and was always totally committed.

In the 1936-37 season Liverpool finished in 18th position whereas his former club, Manchester City, won the First Division championship. The club also finished in mid-table in the 1937-38 and 1938-39 seasons.

Matt Busby's football career was brought to an end by the outbreak of the Second World War. Busby had scored 3 goals in 118 games for Liverpool. He joined the King's Liverpool Regiment and while based in England he guested for Chelsea, Middlesbrough, Reading, Brentford, and Bournemouth.

Joe Mercer, Matt Busby and Don Welsh as army sergeants.
Joe Mercer, Matt Busby and Don Welsh as army sergeants.

After the war Busby was offered a job on the coaching staff at Liverpool. However, Busby wanted a managerial role and in October 1946 he joined Manchester United. Busby later recalled: "Call it confidence, conceit, arrogance, or ignorance, but I was unequivocal about it. At the advanced age of thirty-five I would accept the managership of Manchester United only if they would let me have all my own way. As the manager I would want to manage. I would be the boss. This being so I would not have any excuse if I failed. Nor would I offer any. They could kick me out... But I did think I knew about football and footballers. Technical knowledge alone will not make a manager in any organization. It is incomplete without a feeling for people. Whether the loss of my father had subconsciously given me a feeling of being unprotected, I do not know. Certainly there is some gap for a boy without a father when all other boys around him could talk about theirs incessantly and did." Busby was an immediate success. He led the club to the runners-up spot in the league, in 1946-47 and 1947-48. However, United did win the FA Cup against Blackpool in 1948.

Matt Busby was asked what he thought about England's two star players at the time, Stanley Matthews and Tom Finney: "Stan Matthews was basically a right-footed player, Tom Finney a left-footed player, though Tom's right was as good as most players' better foot. Matthews gave the ball only when he was good and ready and the move was ripe to be finished off. Finney was more of a team player, Matthews being more of an inspiration to a team than a single part of it. Finney was more inclined to join in moves and build them up with colleagues, by giving and taking back. He would beat a man with a pass or with wonderful individual runs that left the opposition in disarray. And Finney would also finish the whole thing off by scoring, which Stan seldom did. Being naturally left-footed, Tom was absolutely devastating on the right wing. An opponent never seemed to be able to get at him. If you were a problem to him he had two solutions to you. How can anybody say who was the greater ? I think I would choose Matthews for the big occasion - he played as if he was playing the Palladium. I would choose Finney, the lesser showman but still a beautiful sight to see, for the greater impact on his team. For moments of magic - Matthews. For immense versatility - Finney. Coming down to an all-purpose selection about whom I would choose for my side if I could have one or the other I would choose Finney."

Manchester United was once again runners-up in the 1948-49 and 1950-51 seasons. Busby finally led the club to the championship in the 1951-52 season. He repeated the achievement in 1955-56 and the 1956-57 seasons. United also reached the 1957 FA Cup Final but were beaten 2-1 by Aston Villa.

Cliff Butler, a member of the backroom staff, later commented: "He (Matt Busby) was wonderful to deal with. He made everybody feel important. Everybody felt the same, whether you were the chairman or the lads who swept the terraces. He always put you at your ease, always made you feel comfortable. It was like talking to your dad. But I was still always in awe of the man. He was a hero when I was a kid, and to actually get to know him ... it was like a Jim'll Fix It, I suppose: to meet and speak with your hero, and actually work with him. He was the most humble of people. If anybody could be excused for thinking they were special, he was the person, but that was never a feeling you got from him. Even people he never met he had an effect on - they felt they knew him. I'm just so sorry I only got to know him in his later years."

Busby and his team began the 1957-58 season full of ambition for an assault on the Football League title, FA Cup and European Cup. On the way home from a European Cup tie against Red Star Belgrade on 6th February 1958, their plane crashed on the runway at Munich Airport. Eight players were killed and two more were injured so badly they never played again. Busby suffered multiple injuries and twice received the last rites, but he recovered from his injuries and left hospital after two months.

Despite the loss of so many players Manchester United reached the 1958 FA Cup Final but were beaten by Bolton Wanderers 2-0. It took several years for Busby to rebuild a new team at Manchester United. The club won the 1963 FA Cup and were league champions in 1964-65 and the 1966-67 seasons. Busby was knighted in 1968.

On 29 May 1968 when the team won the European Cup. He retired as manager a year later but remained at the club as a director. On his retirement Hugh McIlvanney wrote: "It was utterly extraordinary that three great managers, Matt Busby, Jock Stein and Bill Shankly, came from the same area of Scotland, and it was, I think, very significant. These people absorbed the best of the true ethos of that working-class environment. There was a richness of spirit bred into people from mining areas. I'm likely to see it that way because my father worked in the pits for a while, but there is no question that there was a camaraderie. Stein said that he would never work with better men than he It was utterly extraordinary that three great managers, Matt Busby, Jock Stein and Bill Shankly, came from the same area of Scotland, and it was, I think, very significant. These people absorbed the best of the true ethos of that working-class environment. There was a richness of spirit bred into people from mining areas. I'm likely to see it that way because my father worked in the pits for a while, but there is no question that there was a camaraderie. Stein said that he would never work with better men than he did when he was a miner, that the guys who got carried away with football were never going to impress him much, and although Shankly was completely potty about the game and was the great warrior/poet of football, he nevertheless retained that sense of what real men should do, the sense of dignity, the sense of pride. All of that was present in Matt."

Matt Busby died of cancer, on 20th January 1994.

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Ideas for lessons on Football and the Second World War

Primary Sources

(1) Matt Busby, Soccer at the Top (1973)

I believe I have influenced people in my long life in football. I do not suggest that any player or manager has consciously copied me. Experience means not only lessons learned from mistakes. It also means a collection of worthwhile information quite subconsciously pigeonholed in the brainbox, from talking to or watching others with something to say or to show. So although I have not copied any man my football thinking has been influenced by close contact with great men from my boyhood.

I was as football daft as any of the boys in the village of Bellshill, and dafter than most, and we had our idols already. There were two young fellows called Alex James and Hughie Gallacher, for instance. They would be about eighteen or nineteen, I suppose, I about nine or ten. They were little whippets as footballers go, but they were famous. Why, everybody in Bellshill, knew what players they were! They played at the time for two juvenile teams in the area, juvenile meaning teams in lower status than the Scottish League but brimful of the best young players in the villages who had not, or not yet, reached the big game.

I was still at school, of course, but I was hamper boy to James's team, humping kit, and generally helping and fussing about. I do not know why, but something went wrong with Alex James's boots, or they were missing, and the great man borrowed my football boots. I was a big boy and he was a little man. Soon the village knew about it. I proclaimed it to all my friends or whoever was in earshot. "Alex James played in my boots!" It will have been noticed that I proclaim it still, and that is because, as young as I was and as small and insignificant though little Bellshill might seem in the big world of football, I saw magic in those early days, the magic of two of the greatest footballers in the game's history in one small village.

Magic because even then James used to mesmerize his opponents with a feint that said: "Now I'm here, now I'm not", and Gallacher used to paralyse them with a dribbling run and power of shot and a line of pertinent or impertinent patter to go with it...

I played against James and Gallacher in their later but still great days, after Gallacher had left Newcastle United for Chelsea. I was a nobody, but they remembered the boy who had looked after the hamper and always had words of encouragement for me, their opponent now, with a welcome `Well done, son,' or "Well played, Matt." Not that this in any way deterred them from leaving me sitting on my bottom with the rest.

(2) Rick Glanvill, Sir Matt Busby: A Tribute (1994)

His mother, Nellie, was the daughter of an Irishman, Jimmy Greer, who worked down the pit in Orbiston with Matt's father, Alexander. Matt was followed by three girls, Delia, Kathy and Margaret, in the years leading up to the Great War. Privacy was a luxury; baths were taken in a tub in the living room.

Bellshill is a town still riven with the enmity that characterises sectarianism in west central Scotland. Matt's parents were a hard-grafting couple who refused to share the religious bigotries of so many of their neighbours - Catholic and Protestant in uneasy adjacency. Religion for the Busbys was a private matter. Socially, it was important to coexist, for life in this troubled coal and steel area was hard enough. With this in mind, perhaps, in 1914 Matt was sent to school at St Bride's in Bothwell (since demolished - the present school was built in 1973). It's a short trip from Orbiston but a world apart in atmosphere. Bothwell today is better known as the charming, adopted home of successful soccer stars, ex-pat English among them, and even in Matt's day it had a quieter facade than Orbiston and Bellshill. Not that the young 'Mattha' had many carefree years in which to enjoy it.

His family sought refuge from the toughness of life in an unforgiving area, but the catalyst for change was the war, which snatched the lives of Alex Busby, claimed by a sniper's bullet at Arras in France in 1916, and three of Matt's uncles. Of the Busby menfolk, only Jimmy Greer and Matt were left when the war ended. Already an intelligent and well-behaved boy, Matt was compelled by circumstances to grow old before his time. Maturity was a hat he was forced to wear at a young age, and like the trilby for which he was renowned in the fifties, it looked good on him.

Matt had always seemed wise beyond his years and eager to acquire knowledge; the death of his father, and his assumption of the role of man of the house now induced in the amiable youth a certain paternalism. It was a trait for which many a young man whose life was touched by Matt would come to be grateful.

(3) Wilf Mannion, Association Football (1949)

Matt Busby, tall sturdy Scottish international wing half back, who now manages Manchester United with the same distinction that he showed on the football field was the model player in that position.

In fact, I firmly believe that Busby would have been an ideal player in any position on the field simply because he had everything that I have stressed as being necessary in the make-up of a footballer. And he had it developed to an extraordinarily high degree.

His passing, ball control, heading ability, interception, tackling and manoeuvrability were exceptional and to play against him must have been an inside forward's nightmare.

(4) Stanley Matthews , The Way It Was (2000)

Matt Busby joined Manchester City from the small Scottish club Denny Hibernians in 1928, originally as an inside-right, but his career blossomed when City switched him to right-half. He never had a crunching tackle, but so precise was his timing that he stole the ball off your toe. For all he was a resolute defender, he loved to get forward; in many respects he was what we would term today an attacking midfielder. Matt won an FA Cup winners medal in 1934 when Manchester City beat Portsmouth 2-1 in the final. City's teenage goalkeeper Frank Swift was so overcome with emotion he collapsed and had to be carried to the Royal Box to receive his medal. Matt moved on from City to Liverpool in 1936 for what was then a considerable fee of £8,000 and stayed at Anfield until war broke out in 1939 when, like just about every other player of the day, he joined the services. Matt did turn out for Liverpool in unofficial matches during the war years and guested for a number of clubs situated near to wherever he was stationed, but effectively his playing career ended in 1939.

One of Matt's greatest strengths as a player was his passing. Not only could he split open defences but the pass was always so beautifully timed and weighted it was perfect for City forwards such as Eric Brook, Freddie Tilson or Alex Herd to latch on to without breaking their stride. For all players were tightly marked in the thirties, Matt could overcome all that with one sweeping pass. I think his ability to pick out team-mates with superlative passing was indicative of his great vision even then.

That Matt was a visionary there is no doubt. He pioneered youth systems and took part in European football against current thinking. We all accept these as part and parcel of the modern game, but then they were radical. He built three great United teams - one in the immediate post-war years led by Johnny Carey, the Busby Babes of the fifties and United's League Championship and European Cup-winning side of the sixties that included football's holy trinity of George Best, Bobby Charlton and Denis Law.

From player in the thirties to manager in the Swinging Sixties, for all he was an innovator, he never changed his style, always holding true to a belief in sportsmanship, open entertaining football and the virtues of family life. As a manager he enjoyed patriarchal status but because of his receptiveness to new ideas was never considered old-fashioned. To this day, he is still thought of as being one of British football's foremost innovators. In creating his Busby Babes, Matt set up a network of scouts throughout the British Isles to find the very best young players. Up to that point, managers more or less just tapped into what young talent was about within a 30-mile radius of the club. Matt changed all that, but his desire to create a great team of United-bred youngsters was foiled by the Munich air disaster of 1958 in which Matt himself came close to death. Resolute and undeterred, he overcame tragedy and rebuilt. His reward came in 1968 when his League Championship side of the year before became the first English club to win the European Cup when they beat Benfica 4-1 at Wembley.

(5) Tommy Lawton , My Twenty Years of Soccer (1955)

Probably the classiest wing half back I have ever met was Matt Busby, and I am not surprised he has made such a success of his job as manager of Manchester United, for Matt was not only a great player, he was also a great teacher.

Surely football has never seen such an immaculate passer of the ball than the cheerful, likeable Scot. It was uncanny to see him change the direction of a game with one shrewd pass, which always went speedily and accurately to the right man.

There was never anything slipshod about Matt. Only the best would do and no matter where the ball was he was always working, always taking up position, always thinking a couple of moves ahead of anyone else. So no wonder Matt Busby covered more ground in each match than any other player on the field, and to what wonderful purpose!

(6) Jimmy Heale played with Matt Busby at Manchester City. He was interviewed by Rick Glanvill for his book Sir Matt Busby: A Tribute.

It's well known that Matt played at right-half for City, but really his strongest foot was his left. His top move was to get past a few players moving towards the centre of the field, then switch it by hitting a ball over to the corner flag where Ernie Toseland would already be into his stride. That created lots of goal chances. Matt was, I suppose, what you call a "schemer" these days. He was such a good player and yet he only earned himself one cap before wartime. We often used to joke about how good that other fellow must have been to keep him out of the Scottish team. Matt was a great example to the younger lads. But like one or two other of the lads, he'd sneak off to the toilets for a Woodbine on occasion. Having said that I can rarely recall him swearing and he was a clean-living chap on and off the field. He was a great example to the younger players.

(7) Matt Busby, Soccer at the Top (1973)

Call it confidence, conceit, arrogance, or ignorance, but I was unequivocal about it. At the advanced age of thirty-five I would accept the managership of Manchester United only if they would let me have all my own way. As the manager I would want to manage. I would be the boss.

This being so I would not have any excuse if I failed. Nor would I offer any. They could kick me out...

But I did think I knew about football and footballers. Technical knowledge alone will not make a manager in any organization. It is incomplete without a feeling for people. Whether the loss of my father had subconsciously given me a feeling of being unprotected, I do not know. Certainly there is some gap for a boy without a father when all other boys around him could talk about theirs incessantly and did.

Perhaps it induced in me some paternal, protective feeling for other unfortunate or sensitive young people. Whatever induced it I had it. I was only a boy when I left home for the first time to go to Manchester City. Not all boys are tough and adventurous, though in the Seventies fledglings seem to regard it as "chicken" not to leave the nest, whereas it was only the rare bird who flew before the war.

Anyway I was homesick, and it did not help when, having used a senior player's football boots by mistake one day, he gave me a tremendous blasting.

There was a seemingly unbridgeable gulf between first team players and the rest, and an even wider gulf between players and management. They were office managers in those days. A player saw the manager only on Saturday in the coach or if he called you up to his office for a rocket.

(8) Matt Busby, Soccer at the Top (1973)

I had the doubtful pleasure of playing against Stanley Matthews and the real pleasure of playing with him for the combined services. He would come to you with the ball at his dainty feet. He would take you on. You had seen it all before. You knew precisely what he would do and you knew precisely what he would do with you. He would pass you, usually on the outside, but as a novelty on the inside. If you went to tackle him it was merely saving time for him. He then simply beat you. If you didn't he would tease you by coming straight up to you and showing you the ball. And that would be the last you would see of him in that move. If you were covered he would do the same with your cover man and his cover man and so ad infinitum. Then, in his own good time and not before, he would release the perfect pass.

In his moments he would tear a man apart, tear a team apart. He might not be in it for three-quarters of the game. In the other quarter he would destroy you. He wasn't in it in his winning Cup Final for Blackpool against Bolton Wanderers in 1953 for much that mattered until the last phase, during which he destroyed Bolton and laid on the victory. He usually laid everything on for others to finish off. No amount of cover would have stopped him in his magical moments. People were as aware of him as they are of any player today. They set out to stop him as they set out to stop the best today. But the best can't be stopped just by setting people on them.

Stan Matthews was basically a right-footed player, Tom Finney a left-footed player, though Tom's right was as good as most players' better foot. Matthews gave the ball only when he was good and ready and the move was ripe to be finished off. Finney was more of a team player, Matthews being more of an inspiration to a team than a single part of it. Finney was more inclined to join in moves and build them up with colleagues, by giving and taking back. He would beat a man with a pass or with wonderful individual runs that left the opposition in disarray. And Finney would also finish the whole thing off by scoring, which Stan seldom did. Being naturally left-footed, Tom was absolutely devastating on the right wing. An opponent never seemed to be able to get at him. If you were a problem to him he had two solutions to you.

Tom Finney could and would and did play in any forward position. Like Stan Matthews he was never in any trouble with referees. Stan was knighted after his immense period as a player. Tom was awarded the OBE. I do not say that Tom should have played until he was fifty. I do say that I was sorry he did not play for two or three years more than he did, even though he was in his late thirties.

How can anybody say who was the greater ? I think I would choose Matthews for the big occasion - he played as if he was playing the Palladium. I would choose Finney, the lesser showman but still a beautiful sight to see, for the greater impact on his team. For moments of magic - Matthews. For immense versatility - Finney. Coming down to an all-purpose selection about whom I would choose for my side if I could have one or the other I would choose Finney.

(9) Cliff Butler helped produce the Manchester United programme while Matt Busby was manager of the club. He was interviewed by Rick Glanvill for his book Sir Matt Busby: A Tribute.

He (Matt Busby) was wonderful to deal with. He made everybody feel important. Everybody felt the same, whether you were the chairman or the lads who swept the terraces. He always put you at your ease, always made you feel comfortable. It was like talking to your dad. But I was still always in awe of the man. He was a hero when I was a kid, and to actually get to know him ... it was like a Jim'll Fix It, I suppose: to meet and speak with your hero, and actually work with him.

He was the most humble o f people. If anybody could be excused for thinking they were special, he was the person, but that was never a feeling you got from him. Even people he never met he had an effect on - they felt they knew him. I'm just so sorry I only got to know him in his later years.

(10) Hugh McIlvanney is a journalist who became a close friend of Matt Busby. He was interviewed by Rick Glanvill for his book Sir Matt Busby: A Tribute.

It was utterly extraordinary that three great managers, Matt Busby, Jock Stein and Bill Shankly, came from the same area of Scotland, and it was, I think, very significant. These people absorbed the best of the true ethos of that working-class environment. There was a richness of spirit bred into people from mining areas.

I'm likely to see it that way because my father worked in the pits for a while, but there is no question that there was a camaraderie. Stein said that he would never work with better men than he It was utterly extraordinary that three great managers, Matt Busby, Jock Stein and Bill Shankly, came from the same area of Scotland, and it was, I think, very significant. These people absorbed the best of the true ethos of that working-class environment. There was a richness of spirit bred into people from mining areas. I'm likely to see it that way because my father worked in the pits for a while, but there is no question that there was a camaraderie. Stein said that he would never work with better men than he did when he was a miner, that the guys who got carried away with football were never going to impress him much, and although Shankly was completely potty about the game and was the great warrior/poet of football, he nevertheless retained that sense of what real men should do, the sense of dignity, the sense of pride. All of that was present in Matt.